Against All Odds: What Are Your Chances of Getting HIV

https://www.poz.com/legacy/poz_magazine/articles/2014/p195_risk_chart.jpg

Probabilities of HIV transmission per exposure to the virus are usually expressed in percentages or as odds (see chart at the end of this article). For example, the average risk of contracting HIV through sharing a needle one time with an HIV-positive drug user is 0.67 percent, which can also be stated as 1 in 149 or, using the ratios the CDC prefers, 67 out of 10,000 exposures. The risk from giving a blowjob to an HIV-positive man not on treatment is at most 1 in 2,500 (or 0.04 percent per act). The risk of contracting HIV during vaginal penetration, for a woman in the United States, is 1 per 1,250 exposures (or 0.08 percent); for the man in that scenario, it’s 1 per 2,500 exposures (0.04 percent, which is the same as performing fellatio).

As for anal sex, the most risky sex act in terms of HIV transmission, if an HIV-negative top—the insertive partner—and an HIV-positive bottom have unprotected sex, the chances of the top contracting the virus from a single encounter are 1 in 909 (or 0.11 percent) if he’s circumcised and 1 in 161 (or 0.62 percent) if he’s uncircumcised. And if an HIV-negative person bottoms for an HIV-positive top who doesn’t use any protection but does ejaculate inside, the chances of HIV transmission are, on average, less than 2 percent. Specifically, it is 1.43 percent, or 1 out of 70. If the guy pulls out before ejaculation, then the odds are 1 out of 154.

NB:

[SIZE=3]Transmission can occur after one exposure.
[/SIZE]
It is important to emphasize that a person could become infected from having unprotected sex once or a person could have unprotected sex many times and not become infected, regardless of how low or high the risk per exposure is.

A risk of 1% would mean that an average of one infection would occur if 100 HIV-negative people were exposed to HIV through a certain type of sex. It does not mean that a person needs to be exposed 100 times for HIV infection to occur.

REMEMBER:

During sex, our risk perception is replaced by love, lust, trust and intimacy.

www.catie.ca/en/pif/summer-2012/putting-number-it-risk-exposure-hiv

https://www.poz.com/article/HIV-risk-25382-5829

@uwesmake

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thank you very much VILLAGE ELDER .

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Hapo mabasha hawana bahati, ole wao.

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HOW DID THEY CONDACT THIS EXPERIMENT??!!

@introvert KUOM KIASI UONE HUYU MKAMBA MIJINGA

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@uwesmake where did you go wrong?

Yes AIDS is deadly but the HIV virus is not easy to contract otherwise all of us would have been wiped out by now

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It isn’t easy for researchers to calculate the risk of transmission from an exposure to HIV through sex. To do this effectively, a group of HIV-negative individuals need to be followed over time and their exposures to HIV—both the number of times they are exposed and the types of exposure—need to be tracked.

As you can imagine, accurately tracking the number of times a person is exposed to HIV is very difficult. Researchers ask HIV-negative individuals enrolled in these studies to report how many times they have had sex in a given period of time, what type of sex they had, how often they used condoms and the HIV status of their partner(s). Because a person may have trouble remembering their sexual behaviour or may not want to tell the whole truth, this reporting is often inaccurate.

Furthermore, a person does not always know the HIV status of their partner(s). For this reason, researchers usually enroll HIV-negative individuals who are in stable relationships with an HIV-positive partner (also known as serodiscordant couples). Researchers can then conclude that any unprotected sex reported by a study participant counts as an exposure to HIV.

Several studies have aimed to estimate the average risk of HIV transmission from a specific type of unprotected sex (for example, vaginal/anal/oral; insertive/receptive). Due to the difficulties of calculating this risk, these studies have produced a wide range of numbers. To come up with a more accurate estimate for each type of unprotected sex, some researchers have combined the results of individual studies into what is known as a meta-analysis.
http://www.catie.ca/en/pif/summer-2012/putting-number-it-risk-exposure-hiv

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[SIZE=3]Anal sex[/SIZE]
A meta-analysis exploring the risk of HIV transmission through unprotected anal sex was published in 2010.1 The analysis, based on the results of four studies, estimated the risk through receptive anal sex (receiving the penis into the anus, also known as bottoming) to be 1.4%. (This means that an average of one transmission occurred for every 71 exposures.) This risk was similar regardless of whether the receptive partner was a man or woman.

No meta-analysis estimates currently exist for insertive anal sex (inserting the penis into the anus, also known as topping) but two individual studies were conducted to calculate this risk. The first, published in 1999, calculated the risk to be 0.06% (equivalent to one transmission per 1,667 exposures).2 3

[SIZE=3]Vaginal sex[/SIZE]
A meta-analysis of 10 studies exploring the risk of transmission through vaginal sex was published in 2009.4 It estimated the risk of HIV transmission throughreceptive vaginal sex (receiving the penis in the vagina) to be 0.08% (equivalent to 1 transmission per 1,250 exposures).

A meta-analysis of three studies exploring the risk from insertive vaginal sex (inserting the penis into the vagina) was estimated to be 0.04% (equivalent to 1 transmission per 2,500 exposures).4

[SIZE=3]Oral sex[/SIZE]
No meta-analysis estimates exist for oral sex (vaginal or penile) because too few good-quality studies have been completed. This is because it is difficult to find people whose only risk of HIV transmission is unprotected oral sex. A review of the studies that are available was published in 2008 and concluded that vaginal and penile oral sex pose a “low but non-zero transmission probability.”5

In the three studies aimed at calculating the risk of HIV transmission from one act of oral sex, no transmissions were observed among three different populations—lesbian serodiscordant couples, heterosexual serodiscordant couples and single gay men—who reported unprotected oral sex as their only risk for HIV transmission. However, these studies enrolled only a small number of people and followed them for only a short period of time, which may explain the lack of HIV transmissions and makes it impossible to conclude that the risk from oral sex is zero.

http://www.catie.ca/en/pif/summer-2012/putting-number-it-risk-exposure-hiv

so in short tuendele na dfbw(dry fry bila worry)

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This is precisely why this info should not be given to all and sundry.

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Very insightful.
Alafu sasa hawa ma serodiscordant couples, nini inasumbua yule ako -ve?
Vitu zingine unawacha!

Hehe hatukufa ukimwi ishindwe #whistling
Btw the chances are very low for a man who has unprotected vaginal sex with a hiv+ woman who strictly follows her arv meds

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Those numbers mean nothing when you have had a potential exposure. Unajiharianga ukifikiria unakufa

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I understand the strain that we suffer from is the most volatile siezi take chances

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hizo chances ni kucheza russian roulette …

Shida ni kutumia needle when the 148th has just used it

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Meanwhile British researchers have successfully eradicated his from a guy’s system. An intervention that they administered sought out even the dormant viruses and changed their data. Naona dwyfwybilaworry in the horizon

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Lemme ask this?? Can having a raw blow job get u infected??