Perils of technology

My parents always told me ‘sharing is caring’. I’ve always carried those kind words close to my heart. Being the only guy in our apartments with zuku, my neighbour has been looking up to me to provide her with this modern basic need. See, my neighbour is the most beautiful person I’ve ever laid my eyes on. She is the real goddess of beauty; skin so soft it could be bruised by the touch of creatures like you and me, bright sparkling eyes and a voice that can make mere mortals quiver in her presence. Hakuna mwanaume anaweza nyima such an angel password ya WIFI.

It’s a boring Saturday, it’s raining outside and I got 3 hours before the derby kick-off. I decide to keep myself busy. I tried reading a book, then made some tea, then played some stupid game on my phone before finally resigning to watching a TV series. I grab some popcorn to have with my tea (weird combination) and sat on my favourite sofa in preparation for some kickass entertainment. I wasn’t disappointed.

Ten minutes in to my series, I was interrupted by a phone trying to cast to my TV. I recognised the phone. It was my “Angel of beauty’s” phone. What was I to do? Should I notify her that she’s casting to my TV or sit back and enjoy. I did what any respectable gentleman would do; I sat back and waited.

Ohh the things I saw. I could imagine her wondering why the video she recorded of herself masturbating was not casting on her brand new smart TV. The video that shows her perfect succulent breasts. The video that shows how her hips perilously curves perfectly on her body. The video that could make all the girls envious of her body. A body so ripe and enticing.

There before me was a woman I had presumed to be innocent not long ago, oblivious that the private moment of her exploring herself was no longer private. That the good neighbour who generously shares his WIFI password now knew of the birthmark on her left butt cheek. That he had seen the beautiful faces that she makes when the right places are touched. That he had heard the angelic voice that the lucky few will get to hear when the awe moment is reached. See, I was taught to be optimistic so I count myself to be one of the lucky guys in the future.

Suffice to say, before the match started, the bishop had already been soothed to sleep and a new plan of experiencing the goodies first hand was hatched. Hekaya itakam.

Today’s lesson: Be generous with your WIFI passwords

Na kwa wale hawajui casting ni nini, google is your friend.

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Weka mbisha ya mathighs otherwise kiti iletwe

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Yaani hata kuchukua simu upige mbisha hungeweza nkt!

very imagintive

If am sharing my wifi with you just know at one point I will be snooping on you.

Lakini pia maybe ulikuwa unaitwa ukule vitu lakini wewe na kiherehere ukakuja kutuambia vile uliona matiti badala ya kukamua vitu

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[ATTACH=full]68921[/ATTACH]

True, fala assumes that the neighbour does not understand technology, to his own detriment.

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Kuna word language,sign language and digital language,sasa wewe unatumiwa visual telegram ikiwa na exhibit unaanza kutetemeka.Nyandua vitu na ulete exhibit.

Perils of a blondie

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I have to tread slowly coz my girlfriend lives with me na wanajuana…

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hekaya is on point …but bila mbica inarudi 4/10

ungechukua simu uchukue video ya io video ulikua unaona. apana leta apa kelele mingi

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Sawa tu…
[ATTACH=full]68943[/ATTACH]

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schupit

Make sure she does not have security cameras in her house

Yaani unaalikwa ukute vitu lakini badala yake unawasha bajaj…bure kabisa

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If you think that your neighbour is dumb, think again. She could not have accidentally stumbled upon your TV.

Because of the silly way Chromecast setup works, no, not really.
[ol]
[li]Chromecast goes into Setup mode[/li][li]Chromecast becomes an open AP, broadcasting an SSID of Chromecastnnnn (where nnnn is some randomly-generated number)[/li][li]Chromecast outputs to TV “Set me up” along with a 4-character hex code (which seems to be specific to the device, but does not directly correspond to the serial number)[/li][/ol]

Chromecast setup app
[ol]
[li]Searches for available Chromecasts (open APs named Chromecastnnnn)[/li][li]Once selected, asks “Is this the code you see the screen?” showing the 4-character hex code associated with thatChromecast[/li][li]Queries user for SSID (drop-down generated from visible networks) and passkey if necessary.[/li][/ol]

Since the setup app shows you the 4-character ID, it’s essentially like going to an ATM, sticking a stolen card in, then the ATM says “Hello Joe. Is your PIN 1234?” Press Yes and you’re in!

I’ve never seen it display an incorrect/bogus code so far. Frankly I find it very odd that it operates this way. Maybe it’s just wishful thinking but, it feels like it was meant to be something more and they ran out of time.

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2644556

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Enyewe unaweza peleka ng’ombe kisimani lakini huwezi mlazimisha kunywa maji.
Ng’ombe ni ng’ombe tu!!

First you have to understand this is not chromecast. Modern smart TV come with casting capability built in. So if you have a device that supports casting (miracast, mirrorshare etc), you can cast your device to the tv as long as you’re in the same network. Nunua smart tv kwanza halafu ulete makende hapa. Meffi