On KNH

Najua hii story ya kuswitch patient ili-shock wengi. Ilifanya pia daktari na CEO wapelekwe forced leave.

Lakini mimi nashangaa, how in heaven was that incident their fault? If the patient was wrongly tagged, and was unconscious so huwezi muuliza to confirm identity, how was the operating doctor to know there was a mistake? In this case mwenye makosa ni mwenye aliweka tag. As a previous thread said, doctors wataanza kuwa reluctant to operate on unconscious unidentified patients.

Same as CEO. I don’t see how she could have foreseen this. If it was due to a systemic error that she had refused to fix, I’d understand. But in this case, how in heaven would she have prevented whoever did the identification from making that error? Was she supposed to stand and oversee everything that happens in the hospital physically?

I know KNH has a lot of systemic issues that need dealing with, and I wish we’d sent the CEO and others away for that. But in this scenario, ata mimi ningeona ikiwa kama witchhunt because it sounds like an error committed by a few people who should have been more keen on the job.

We can give the surgeons the benefit of the doubt, lakini CEO hapanaaaa. Ultimately, the buck stops with her, and those cases of incompetence were too many to be ignored. Kama hawezi manage 'spitali basi akwende huko kericho afanye kazi rahisi kama kuchuna majani chai.

wewe uko na ukabila, mtu kwa sababu ni mkale aende achune majani chai, kuma wewe pia

where did this come from? i can’t even begin to imagine how someone could be molesting a chicken and typing a post at the same time.

Pole babu, achanilale masaa yanguimefika

One Bernard Githae, the Director of Clinical Services, was also sent on compulsory leave. I’m yet to see “his people” protesting.
Na uheshimu mamako.

Buck stops with her sikatai. But nashindwa what should she have done in this case? I hardly think there’s anything in her mandate as CEO that she could have done to prevent this from happening. Labda afterwards (which she tried by sending people home).

Kuma x3 wewe, mbona unaingililia wakale, wewe ni kikuyu jinga sana, uza mtura yako na supu ya kichwa ya mbuzi hapo githurai pole pole

To be honest I’m struggling with this site. Are these the signs that I need to hang my boots ? @Okwonkwo and @Kimakia Are you guys saying that we old weasels it’s time !

The way I see it, such a blunder should never ever happen, so sending people home after the fact…that was her shutting the stable door after the horse had bolted. The surgeons can claim they fucked up because of so called “systemic failures”, which should be addressed by management. If everyone comes up with an excuse, then at the end of the day it will be nobody’s fault, and we’ll go back to business as usual. We might as well blame the patient.

Kijana nimekwambia uheshimu mamako.

Your system sounds very unjust to me. Send people home for failing to do what they’re supposed to do, or doing what they shouldn’t do. That’s fine. But sending someone home because of another person’s mistake?

That’s the logic I was questioning. In that, I think Sicily should have resigned too because this happened under her Ministry. What she did (sending CEO home) is no different from what the CEO did. At least in Koros’s case she sent the actual people involved (but I still say hiyo ilikuwa mistake ya receiving nurses tu, sio ya daktari).

https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/health/article/2001271985/new-twist-in-knh-surgery-blunder-probe

From that link KNH say the man who was wrongfully operated was tagged as “Unknown African Male” while the one who was to be operated was tagged as “Unknown Male”, what kind of tagging system is that? It clearly lacks any distinct, objective sequencing. si they should have atleast tagged them using numbers like 001, 002, 003, i wonder how they tagged or would have tagged other unconscious patients lacking identification details. The CEO is clearly at fault and the guys in charged of the registry and those who delivered the patient to the surgeons

With all due respect, it sounds to me like you’re excusing mediocrity. I just think sending her home was because of all the scandals that have hit the hospital, not just the botched surgery. Btw, in non-shithole countries, she would have resigned of her own accord. But this being Africa, people must seek the backing of “our people” and say things like “I’d rather die” before being forced out.

Explain to me like I’m 5 how this was a case of mediocrity on her part. Do you sign up to fall for your inferiors’ mistakes as CEO?

And like I said, had she been sent home because of the other well known KNH scandals she’s not dealt with, I’d agree. But she wasn’t. She was sent home because of the outrage this particular issue caused na tusijidanganye.

I hope umetoka Mau

The CEO’s main responsibility is to ensure the systems in place serve the purpose they were designed to serve efficiently and effectively, that the registry could make such a horrific mistake on account of a tagging system that is clearly confusing means the systems in place are faulty, when you are at the top your job is to ensurethose at the bottom make very few mistakes and low-impact mistakes, hio ikikushinda achia wengine kazi

Nimecheki hiyo link yako and in the process nimepata hii:
KNH failed to adhere to WHO standards, report shows - The Standard Health

It seems there’s a set way to identify patients in such cases that KNH rarely follows. In that case naona how the CEO is to blame. But @kyuktothecore haukuwa helpful kwangu just vaguely stating the buck stops with her without showing me what she didn’t do right.

Are you saying that if the doctor finds the patient going in for CS is a man he should do so since that is what the tag says???

Mimi si wa Chebarbar. I believe in personal responsibility though. If a leader fails to set up systems (like I’ve now found out Koros failed), we can blame him or her.

But if their subordinate fails to do their duty, why should we blame the leader ati coz buck stops with them? What does that even mean? This is not Japan where guys take responsibility even for things they couldn’t foresee, like a Transport Minister resigning over a train derailment.