Legal question about inharited stuff Vs Divorce

E.g you are married and you and wife end up parting ways in a court divorce case were matrimonial property is to be gawanishwad.

Now, during the lengthy divorce period the mans father dies and the guy inherits property

The question is:
Will this newly inherited property be up for kugawanishwa in the divorce settlement by the court ?

Does wife have legal right to 50% of said newly inherited property ?

Asante in Advance.

Hio risto ya “contribution of either spouse towards its acquisition” ina mean cargo inherited ni ya mwenye ku inherit bila pingamizi yoyote ?

Kenya’s Court of Appeal reverses 50:50 ruling on matrimonial properties
FRIDAY DECEMBER 10 2021

Kenya’s Court of Appeal judges have settled on [COLOR=rgb(247, 218, 100)]sharing of properties based on each spouse’s contribution. PHOTO | FILE | NMG
Summary
[ul]
[li]The courts have been struggling on the question of whether spouses should split matrimonial property equally upon divorce.[/li][li]According to Kenya’s Matrimonial Property Act (2013), "ownership of matrimonial property vests in the spouses [COLOR=rgb(247, 218, 100)]according to the contribution of either spouse towards its acquisition, and shall be divided between the spouses if they divorce or their marriage is otherwise dissolved.”[/li][/ul]
https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/tea/news/east-africa/court-reverses-50-50-ruling-on-matrimonial-properties-3647812

Huku labda uulize “wangapi” ndio upate jibu meaningful.

Even in the western world, inherited wealth is not considered matrimonial
considering Kenya considers the “contribution of either spouse towards its acquisition,” you should not worry
don’t joint-register assets if she has not contributed financially
le her single-register her own purchases
keep a paper trail

@dingoo_wa_ingoo maoni?

mtu wa kawaida mwenye ana property hapa na pale anafaa kuwa anajua sheria. mwanaume ignorant tu ndio atawacha sweat yake iende ivi ivi. kuna njia mingi za kuown property, such that kikiumana hakuna mtu ataenda na mali yako

under kenyn law, matrimonial property is

(a) the matrimonial home or homes;
(b) household goods and effects in the matrimonial home or homes; or
(c) any other immovable and movable property jointly owned and acquired during the subsistence of the marriage.

so, it is quite possible under kenyan law to be married and for you [or your spouse] to own and acquire property independently. not all property that is acquired by a married person falls under the category of matrimonial property. But that’s just the legal principle - ma jaji ma feminazi huku nje wanafanya vituko by misinterpreting very simple legal text.

now, that law also says that the interest of any person in any immovable or movable property acquired or inherited before marriage does not form part of matrimonial property. But your guy here inherited the property in the course of the lengthy divorce period. So the question begs:- does the wife therefore have legal right to 50% of said newly inherited property ? short answer? NO. WHY? here is why

that law also states that ownership of matrimonial property vests in the spouses according to the contribution of either spouse towards its acquisition, and is divided between the spouses if they divorce or their marriage is otherwise dissolved.

So, if that is the law, what did the man’s wife contribute to the acquisition of the property which came to the man’s possession in the course of the lengthy divorce proceedings and as an inheritance following the death of the man’s father? none, I’d think. and if she didn’t contribute anything she cannot be entitled to anything.

but hey, what do I know?

Wacha wasiwasi.
Hio inherited wife hawezi gusa.
My response has no legal basis ni common sense tu kupima na macho manenos…coz what of mzees widow and your siblings (incase wako).

No.
Unless your father wishes to give out some of his property to your ex spouse.

In the Western world, inherited wealth is matrimonial if you inherit it during your marriage.

Thanks for that

Inherited property isn’t acquired, it’s inherited

So in the event of divorce, you should keep that along with any other properties you acquired before the marriage