David Ndii talks Turkana Oil & Jubilee Borrowing & The @ Purple Local Employee Laws

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQ66r_4fnBg

Let him incite on…he is approaching the red line; not the Red Sea.

Of course it sounds like incitement to you.

Yep!

Actions do have consequences.
Poking a lion with a finger at your peril. It is what it is.

Who cares as long as RWNEEEBP… If he will be in the ballot 2022 it’s kumīra kumīra again … At least he solved the issue of voter apathy in Mt Kenya . He is the reason we all wake up early and line up to vote :D:D:D:D

Majimbo talk all over again. What are the benefits of majimbo or federalism?

Jaramogi, Ngala and even Moi (KADU) at one time favoured majimbo. What Ndii is saying is that representative politics should die in favour of public barazas. But wouldn’t that create ethnicity?

From wikipedia:

Majimbo (the Swahili word for, “regions”) is aSwahili term that is commonly used in Kenyato refer to the idea of political devolution of power to the country’s regions. It is alleged by critics, including former vice-president Oginga Odinga in his book Not Yet Uhuru, to have been coined by European settlers in Kenya’sWhite Highlands region, around the time of independence in 1963, who preferred to retain an autonomous, ethnically-based governance over the region. It has also been alleged, by some of its critics, that majimbo is a pretext for the type of communal violence that has plagued Kenya’s elections especially since the return of multiparty politics. In his auto biography titled Illusions of Power, one G.G Kariuki, a long serving KANU Member of Parliament, goes as far as to allege the existence of a plot to instigate communal violence in Kenya’s independence elections by supporters of a Majimbo system of government.

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Independence-eraEdit[/SIZE]
The original plan, as created by Wilfred Havelock, Michael Blundell, and R. S. Alexander, would have created three autonomous, self-governing regions (Rift Valley, Western and Coast) in Kenya, which would share governance of the country based upon the mandate of the regional governments. This way, The Kikuyu and Luo people would each receive their own majority-ethnic governments and would negotiate with each other and with the other region for the creation and execution of any law on the national level. This was assumed as reasonable because of the fear that tribalistpolitics between the Kikuyu and Luo under aWestminster system would have been damaging for the other ethnic minorities in Kenya, including the European settlers and Asian residents. It became a part of the party platform for Ronald Ngala’s KADU, which competed in the first post-independence elections against Jomo Kenyatta’s nationalistKenya African National Union party. In the Lancaster house constitutional conferences, Ngala’s K.A.D.U delegation managed to negotiate the adoption of Federal system of governance based on 8 autonomous regions based on Kenya’s provinces. However amendments to Kenya’s constitution meant by 1970 Kenya had reverted to being a unitary state.

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Moi-era and post-Moi usageEdit[/SIZE]
At one point during his presidency, Daniel arap Moi is alleged to have favoured the idea of majimbo for the regions. The communal violence allegedly organised by the Youth for Kanu '92 lobby group, which broke out during the 1992 general election, featured rhetoric identifiable with a more violent interpretation of the Majimbo advocating for the mass relocation of Kenyans to their respective tribes’ ancestral homelands.[1][2] However, since the end of his government, he is known to have denounced the idea.

[SIZE=4]2007 ElectionEdit[/SIZE]
Both the Orange Democratic Movement, under Raila Odinga, and the ODM-K, underKalonzo Musyoka, had also endorsed a plan of ethnoregional decentralisation, as had theShirikisho Party, which was part of the Party of National Unity, as part of their platforms for the 2007 Kenyan elections. Under Raila’s majimbo plan, which followed the Bomas draft of the proposed constitution of 2004, the nation would be divided into 13 regions, which in turn would be divided into a number of districts. Each district will have an elected government, a budget and a parliament. The central government would be in charge of national institutions like armed forces, universities, national hospitals and highways. The plan, however, became a central point of opposition against Raila’s and Musyoka’s campaigns for the presidency, as it was seen by the PNU, and as it was seen by the KANU party of Uhuru Kenyatta, as a threat to national unity and the return of ethnic violence to the country.

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Controversy over the termEdit[/SIZE]
Because of its original usage as a plan for ethnoregional devolution that was promoted by the European settlers as a post-independence fallback bid to retain some political power in a majority-Black Africancountry, the later usage of the term as “devolution” has engendered controversy in the press. Indeed, the Bomas draft defines devolution as [I]usambazaji wa madaraka/I and in the campaigns for the 2010 constitutional referendum, within which devolution again, featured as part of the draft constitution, the term Majimbo was ignored by the proponents of the draft, in favour of ‘Ugatuzi.’

Interpretations tend to differ based on one’s exposure. Unless confirmed from a holistic legal perspective, worry not about unproved allegations.

Case example, Federalism in Nigeria. What Ndii has left out, again from wikipedia:

[SIZE=4]Effects of Federalism, Nigerian styled.Edit[/SIZE]
A much-criticized effect of the current type of federalism, of 36 states from previous pre civil war 3 regions is the creation of a political subclass of state bureaucracies, often headed by governors who are accused of and sometimes successfully prosecuted for, monetary corruption.

Furthermore, one of the outstanding peculiarities of Nigerian politics emanates from the promulgation of sharia law in the northern states, which is only applicable to Muslim residents, while Nigerian states outside the “sharia zone” operate their legal systems by common and customary law.

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Problems of Nigerian FederalismEdit[/SIZE]
1.

Power Sharing:-

Power sharing among the component unit poses a problem to the NIGERIAN FEDERALISM because it is not always properly defined

Corruption,Favouritism and Nepotism:-

These are problems of the NIGERIAN FEDERALISM

Boundary and Disputes:-

This has been a continuous problem between states or local government and has been a threat on the corporate existence of the nation’s state

Ethnic Disharmony:-

There is distrust among the various ethnic groups in the country

Census:-

For sometime in the affairs of this country there has been the problem of conducting reliable and acceptable census

ndii destoys his own argument when he brings in tribe and boundaries. How will each governer determine his border e.g. Kilifi land under irrigation begins here and ends there ? people will pick up pangas and fight! And who lives the county and who is allowed to stay? Will Kilifi or Mombasa counties buy back the Kenyatta’s vast land for instance ama they’ll just grab it?

Aspects of this system can still be implemented if every month the M.P. or the governor meets his people officially like in the U.S. and you air views and insult each other hadi mnashiba. In the U.S. they are known as Town Hall Meetings.

Fart in the air

Crossing a red line is wen,a president speaking to the nation while visibly drunk,congratulating police when children have been massacred.Is a president saying in a very cheerfully that he can’t fight corruption. Is when national heros named by a president are those who campaigned for him. As Duale would say, hii inchi.sio ya Mama yake. Red line ni yeye. He will regret why he became a president if he’ll ever be sober enuff! He will have the worst legacy ,worse than Moi,worse than Trump. Let him know Kenya belongs to all Kenyans its not his personal property so he can draw lines. He is a public servant not a ngod. Ati redline. The guy knows he’s lost legitimacy and so he’s now trying to intimidate his way back to the respect of Kenyans ndio mana anatuvalia chains and is being escorted by military in public functions in empty stadiums! Atajua hajui! Ati red line! Red line ni yeye! Bure kabisa.

I support Ndii 100%

Those town hall meetings are amazing. I’ve been to one wueh! One thing I admire about Americans is civic participation. If they’re upset about something they take it upon themselves to rectify it with fiery energy and resolve. I wish we had such forums in Kenya where elected representatives must meet with the people and have a Q-A sort of thing. It would keep them on their toes and increase accountability. If you think about the problems facing us, from road carnage, nduthi menace, unemployment…we have so much to talk about, in a give and take manner. It should never be a one sided conversation like those political speeches during funerals. These are the sort of dialogues we need, sio za yule jamaa.

Kenya simply inherited a system of ethnic balkanization from the imperalists. The provinces and now counties follow the same trend. Prof. Ndii is a distinguished economist. Schooled at Oxford no less. Some of you here have never as much as read an economics book yet in your sycophancy are just opposing b4 u interrogate the issue. Nigerias problem is very different and is mostly a religious conflict than a tribal one. Either way, the exclusion suffered by various ethnic groups for over half a decade recquires that they get their own government to whom they can pay taxes to. Its implausible for every Kenyan to pay taxes,sometimes as much as 60% of their income then that kitty is used to give extra development to areas that are pro government! Like a token of appreciation for their support or a bribe. Using tax from opposition areas as well.

Kenya simply inherited a system of ethnic balkanization from the imperalists. The provinces and now counties follow the same trend. Prof. Ndii is a distinguished economist. Schooled at Oxford no less. Some of you here have never as much as read an economics book yet in your sycophancy are just opposing b4 u interrogate the issue. Nigerias problem is very different and is mostly a religious conflict than a tribal one. Either way, the exclusion suffered by various ethnic groups for over half a decade recquires that they get their own government to whom they can pay taxes to. Its implausible for every Kenyan to pay taxes,sometimes as much as 60% of their income then that kitty is used to give extra development to areas that are pro government! Like a token of appreciation for their support or a bribe. Using tax from opposition areas as well.

Ndii is on point. He’s talking sense.

we unajua ni nini unasema? In most countries where they have majimbo there was a civil war before waheshimiane. It happened in the U.S. It happened in Nigeria. Federalism has many challenges.

We just got a new katiba now you guys want a new one? If governors are already calling for jobs to be discriminatory, what happens if we go the full self governance route? President atakuwa anasema kitu, Joho anamwuambia “fuck you and your directives! We are free!”

It will become a military state. Matiang’i anasema free education. A governor anasema, “me and my people hatutambui nonsense!”

there was a governor who opposed trump recently. In the U.S. the president has to resort to underhand techniques just to get some things done. Life is tough for U.S. presidents. I saw Obama crying because of gun laws and he can’t do shit about those laws. Some presidents don’t support capital punishment but he can’t do shit to change it. “In California we like frying blacks and that’s the way we like it! Mr. President!”