The morality of keeping loved ones in comas alive for decades

TrumanCapote

Village Sponsor
#1
I'm conflicted about this issue.

French and ex-PSG star Jean-Pierre Adams has died at the age of 73 after spending 39 years in a coma.

Adams was pronounced dead on Monday at the Nimes University Hospital.

He had been in a deep coma since March 17, 1982, following an anaesthesia error.

During his playing days, Adams represented France's national team on 22 occasions, while he turned out for clubs such as Nice and Paris Saint-Germain at club level.
 

TrumanCapote

Village Sponsor
#2
Yes, life is sacrosanct but is it life when someone goes into a coma as a child then you keep them alive for decades in nursing homes where they keep getting raped and giving birth. I don't think it's fair to the patient to be subject to this quality of life. In Africa such people are used to attain diabolical spiritual powers. Assuming in the west that isn't the motivation why put a loved one through such for so long. She's been raped before, given birth before and her family had insisted that she would have only female caregivers. That's why I can't stand nurses. They think they are God bcz their patients are helpless.

 

TrumanCapote

Village Sponsor
#3
You'd rather let your loved one go than leaving them at the mercy of this commercial nurses who are just in it for the money it's not a calling.

 

Lionheart

Village Elder
#7
Yes, life is sacrosanct but is it life when someone goes into a coma as a child then you keep them alive for decades in nursing homes where they keep getting raped and giving birth. I don't think it's fair to the patient to be subject to this quality of life. In Africa such people are used to attain diabolical spiritual powers. Assuming in the west that isn't the motivation why put a loved one through such for so long. She's been raped before, given birth before and her family had insisted that she would have only female caregivers. That's why I can't stand nurses. They think they are God bcz their patients are helpless.

This is pure evil, normal, physically whole people taking advantage of the sick, or the incapacitated.
Once it's clear the person cannot recover consciousness, I think it's fair to authorise removal of life support. Of course I can imagine the monumental dilemma that such a decision is. Very difficult to forgive oneself for having to make a life and death choice for a loved one. Some people may equate that to killing, and live with guilt, and I think that's why you're conflicted about it. I'd expect that to be a normal spiritual crisis.
I can't speak of how God would judge that, I don't know, but I believe that, knowing the limits of human endurance, He has given man the ability to reason, so that some ethical puzzles can be overcome to allow life to continue. One must reach a higher than normal state of mind, and trust that it sits well with God for humankind to accept the inevitability of death in certain adverse situations. Remember Abraham having to sacrifice Isaac? Not the same, but similar.
Ultimately, letting the person go is like an act of worship--and essentially, it should be, including asking for forgiveness for doing a terrible thing which has to be done--that of submitting the soul to the Creator, but with a degree of honour. I don't want to pretend to have an answer, but I think that is the best that mortals can do.
 

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