Samson kills 1000 Philistines with the jawbone of a donkey

#1
Suspension of disbelief, sometimes called willing suspension of disbelief, is the intentional avoidance of critical thinking or logic in examining something unreal or impossible in reality, such as a work of speculative fiction, in order to believe it for the sake of enjoyment.

The poet and aesthetic philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge introduced the term "suspension of disbelief" in 1817 and suggested that if a writer could infuse a "human interest and a semblance of truth" into a fantastic tale, the reader would suspend judgement concerning the implausibility of the narrative.

You can now enjoy the clip below:
 

Attachments

mbwakali

Village Elder
#3
This is after he did this "Samson went and caught three hundred foxes; and he took torches, turned the foxes tail to tail, and put a torch between each pair of tails. 5 When he had set the torches on fire, he let the foxes go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burned up both the shocks and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves."
 

slevyn

Village Elder
#4
This is after he did this "Samson went and caught three hundred foxes; and he took torches, turned the foxes tail to tail, and put a torch between each pair of tails. 5 When he had set the torches on fire, he let the foxes go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burned up both the shocks and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves."
:D:Danimal rights an PETA walikuwa wapi?
 

Soprano

Village Elder
#6
Suspension of disbelief, sometimes called willing suspension of disbelief, is the intentional avoidance of critical thinking or logic in examining something unreal or impossible in reality, such as a work of speculative fiction, in order to believe it for the sake of enjoyment.

The poet and aesthetic philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge introduced the term "suspension of disbelief" in 1817 and suggested that if a writer could infuse a "human interest and a semblance of truth" into a fantastic tale, the reader would suspend judgement concerning the implausibility of the narrative.

You can now enjoy the clip below:
This is after he did this "Samson went and caught three hundred foxes; and he took torches, turned the foxes tail to tail, and put a torch between each pair of tails. 5 When he had set the torches on fire, he let the foxes go into the standing grain of the Philistines, and burned up both the shocks and the standing grain, as well as the vineyards and olive groves."
Wow!
What can I say?
The bible is full of truly ridiculous stories.
 

Euler

Village Elder
#9
The story of Exodus is always disputed by historical facts. However, I still think ancient Egyptians and Palestinians had cross-cultural exchanges. The groups living in Palestine, Jews and Arabs learnt and copied most of Egyptian mythology. The bible, in one way or another, can be tied to Egyptian mythology
 

Top