• Happy New Year, and Wishing You A Productive 2021

Indonesian airliner crash may be linked to plane being grounded for nine months during lockdown

Ndindu

Village Elder
#1
Officials investigating last Saturday's Boeing airliner crash in Indonesia are understood to be probing a possible link to the plane's prolonged grounding during last year’s Covid-19 lockdowns.
The 27-year-old Boeing 737-500, which crashed into the sea off Jakarta with 62 people on board, spent nearly nine months out of service last year because of reduced flight timetables caused by the pandemic.
While officials conducting the inquiry have not yet commented on the cause of the crash, experts are now speculating that it may be due to technical faults caused by the plane’s lack of regular use.
1610596668757.png

“There’s a major problem starting to raise its head in terms of restoring these aircraft because while out of service for nine or 10 months, they need to be kept operating, otherwise they deteriorate,” said Hugh Ritchie, chief executive of Aviation Analysts International, an Australian air safety consulting firm.
 

Ingushetia

Senior Villager
#4
Nikisoma story za aircraft developing faults in the sky, they say the thing is supposed to glide. Wanapeana hata the gradient to show it can float in the air hadi ifike nearby airport. However, in reality these things fall from the sky like rocks. Pilots and aeronautical engineers hebu tuelezeni the truth on whether these things really glide ama ni chocha tu za kufanya watu wasi panic in the face of the inevitable.
 
#5
Nikisoma story za aircraft developing faults in the sky, they say the thing is supposed to glide. Wanapeana hata the gradient to show it can float in the air hadi ifike nearby airport. However, in reality these things fall from the sky like rocks. Pilots and aeronautical engineers hebu tuelezeni the truth on whether these things really glide ama ni chocha tu za kufanya watu wasi panic in the face of the inevitable.
They Malaysia
 

majizee

Village Elder
#8
Officials investigating last Saturday's Boeing airliner crash in Indonesia are understood to be probing a possible link to the plane's prolonged grounding during last year’s Covid-19 lockdowns.
The 27-year-old Boeing 737-500, which crashed into the sea off Jakarta with 62 people on board, spent nearly nine months out of service last year because of reduced flight timetables caused by the pandemic.
While officials conducting the inquiry have not yet commented on the cause of the crash, experts are now speculating that it may be due to technical faults caused by the plane’s lack of regular use.
View attachment 344618

“There’s a major problem starting to raise its head in terms of restoring these aircraft because while out of service for nine or 10 months, they need to be kept operating, otherwise they deteriorate,” said Hugh Ritchie, chief executive of Aviation Analysts International, an Australian air safety consulting firm.
Si you told us not to board the Boeing 737 Max? It is the planes that have not crashed that you should be worried about, like this one.
 

Top